Gaudi Day

Can’t go to Barcelona and not Gaudi. Sunday we hit the highlights: Park Güell and Sagrada Familia. We knew we had to go to the park, but didn’t really know what to expect. It’s beautiful and there’s even some shade. Very important in the almost solstice day sun.

Jake rides and escalator when there are perfectly good stairs next to it.

We walked. You don’t have to. (More on our crazy choices to walk later.) There’s a big hill and many steps BUT there’s also a couple of escalators. There’s also a nice bus that goes right there from the corner of our street, but why would we do that? Up we marched. The entrance to the park is at 150 (492 feet); the top is at 210 meters (689 feet). No me importa. It’s good for us. Jake is young and I am planning to go to Patagonia.

Anyway, the park is amazing and very Gaudi. We wandered around and thought we should go into the Gaudi Museum, but tickets had to be purchased online (pretty common these days) and the site was being finicky, so we gave up. We use the “let’s walk this way” method of exploration. There are several different suggested routes through the park, but we chose to wander. The path is mostly circular and we got to hear some lovely salsa music near the viaducts. Gaudi was inspired by nature, tried to consider ecological needs when he designed and was not at all a fan of straight lines.

Gaudi was very religious and very political. He was a Catalan separatist who even spent a few nights in jail after being arrested at a protest. We have seen the separatist flag flying around town, but, despite some fierce opinions, Cataluña is still a part of Spain. He also was kind of a weird dude. Because he had rheumatism and his doctor suggested vegetarianism, he ended up living on lettuce, olive oil, and some nuts. In his later life, he became a recluse and his shabby attire contributed to his death. He was hit by a tram, but nobody recognized him and he did not receive adequate medical attention because people thought he was a homeless person.

From the park, we walked back down the hill and ran into a little Lebanese restaurant. Yum! There are only so many patatas bravas one can eat. Hummus and falafel hit the spot. If you happen to be in the Gracia neighborhood, give Sannin a try.

While there, we debated whether we should go inside Sagrada Familia. Yes. We should. We looked at a couple of pics online and promptly bought tickets. Wow! The light streaming through the stained glass is breathtaking. Construction on Gaudi’s masterpiece cathedral began in 1882 and was supposed to be finished in time for the centennial of his death in 2026, but Covid had other ideas.

My pictures cannot do it justice, but at least you can get some idea.

Between Gaudi jaunts, we stopped at a place I just happened to notice on the map: Plaça de John Lennon! Well worth the few extra blocks. It’s a plaza named after John with a small playground and murals. I took a few photos.

Don’t Do As I Do, Unless You Like Stairs

Today, Monday, was our last day in Barcelona. We stopped back at the La Boqueria market to wander by ourselves, since we had only been there on the tour. You really can’t beat watermelon juice that is just pressed watermelon. Yum! We walked around and took in all the foodie sites and we might even have some treats to bring home.

Steven (you remember him, he’s usually on these trips) had reminded me that there is a cable car, or telefèric, to the top of Montjuïc, where there is castle with incredible views of the city. You can take the Metro to a funicular that drops you right at the cable car. Do you think that is what we chose? If you do, you don’t know us. We walked. The market was halfway there so it made sense to us.

Today’s total, according to my semi-accurate phone health data stands at 24,160 steps, 9.2 miles, 34 floors. Not all at once, but a fair amount of climbing to the cable car.

If you are smart, you will take the funicular up and walk down (or don’t walk at all). You can also take the funicular to or from the top and only do the cable car one way (or not at all). We did the round trip and thought it was fabulous. The castle, with a separate entrance fee, offered more amazing views plus castles are cool! Mostly, you are outside the castle so don’t leave your hat and sunglasses in the locker thinking you’ll be inside like I did.

We did choose to take the funicular and Metro back. We hadn’t been on the Metro yet and we discovered that it’s very clean and easy. We had Venezuelan arepas for lunch at Tumatey. Muy rico! and finally, went to a bookstore to buy a Catalan Pepa pig book for the grandbaby. She’s going to speak many, many Pepa languages before we’re done.

After a break, we headed out for our last night and briefly debated going into Casa Batlló, which is only a couple blocks from us, but the 35€ price tag scared us off. Maybe next time.

Tomorrow, we take the train to Madrid.

3 thoughts on “Gaudi Day

  1. Esther Getto

    Oh Sue, I want to go to Barcelona!! but I will take all available escalators and funiculars. Sandy and I were there for one day and it wasn’t enough!
    What a wonderful trip, cant’ wait to hear about Madrid.
    Loe and Hugs,
    Mom

    Like

  2. Jim Simpson

    Love Antonio Gaudio. You need to go outside Barcelona and visit his chapel in Colonia Guell. Walk the old factory town for more Gaudi inspired architecture Used to be a short train ride.

    Like

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