It’s not goodbye, it’s see you next August (we hope)

On Saturday, we said goodbye to Seuss the cat (and Paris) again, but we didn’t let a moment go to waste in those last few days, so I’m going to pretend we’re still there and save London for the next installment.

On Thursday, we took what we thought would be our last long stroll in Paris. We headed back to Ground Control to meet the woman who is responsible for kicking off all this craziness: my bestie, Newman. You may recall that she lives in Armes, outside the booming metropolis of Clamecy, in Burgundy, where we stayed last year. She came to town so I could at least spend a few hours with her before we headed out and we wanted to meet her somewhere near where she was taking the train back.

Steven and I took a very minor detour on the way, which was mostly a walk along the Seine, to see the Village de St. Paul. Well, I saw the sign and curiosity got the best of me, as per usual. Totally worth the three blocks extra. You can even see the remains of the ancient walls of Philippe Auguste. It’s full of art and antique dealers and while Steven thought it was a little too hipster (wait till you hear about where we are in London), I thought it was picture-worthy and a new discovery. I love a new discovery.

After lunch, Steven left to get some work done (boo! but someone has to pay for the madness) and Newman and I walked along what she described as Paris’ High Line. It’s much more tranquil than that (of course, it was August), but I also say that because it’s lined with gardens and even a park.

Before we bid adieu, I even got to see Newman’s wife Sylvia for a minute. Next time, more together time!

Our last day in Paris (so sad) turned out to be fabulous! We didn’t plan on a long walk on Friday, but, well, we can’t seem to help it. Last year, we didn’t make it to the Musée de l’Orangerie. It’s a tres popular place right in the Jardin des Tuileries, so book in advance. It’s well worth it. The museum is famous for the two oval rooms containing Claude Monet’s Water Lilies cycle. Wow! I could have spent hours looking.

(My zen moment of the blog: If you go, put your phone down and look at the paintings instead of taking pictures of them and walking by or taking pictures of yourself standing in front of the art. Truly look at the art! Live in the moment! And now back to our regularly scheduled nonsense.)

The rest of the museum houses other works by Monet and paintings by Picasso, Cézanne, Matisse, Modigliani, and Renoir among others. We got the audio guide, which was very helpful but also a bit overwhelming as it had information on ALL the paintings and most were at least a minute long. The museum isn’t huge, but we have about a 90-minute limit on absorbing art, which was just about the right amount of time.

After the museum, we decided that, having not even had a croissant, we had to at least have crepes. We wandered of in not completely the direction back and hit Le P’tit Breton. The place is tiny, but we just missed the dejeuner rush, so we got a seat pretty quickly and couldn’t resist the menu d’jour of savory, drink, and dessert. Yum! Highly recommend.

From there, we walked back, relaxed and packed and made a plan for dinner. As you know, many places in Paris are closed in August, but we picked a Vietnamese restaurant the Googs said was open. Once again, the Googs steered us wrong, but we had passed a Thai and Japanese place on the way there. We first opted for Thai, but it had started drizzling and the place had no AC, so Japanese it was! Good food, good company, good city and a beautiful Parisian night in which to walk back.

All is well in the land.

Saturday it was on to London on the Eurostar …

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